SyFy: ‘Ghost Hunters’ Renewed For Ninth Season, Winter Premiere Date Announced

Via Press Release:

SYFY’S HIT REALITY SERIES GHOST HUNTERS RETURNS FOR A NINTH SEASON THIS WINTER

16 All-New Season 9 Episodes to Debut in January 2013

NEW YORK – November 13, 2012 – Ghost Hunters, Syfy’s longest-running original reality series, returns for a ninth season this winter. Sixteen all-new season 9 episodes are slated to premiere beginning January 16, 2013 at 9 PM ET/PT.

“Ghost Hunters has proven itself to be an enormously popular paranormal series that continues to evolve successfully with each new season,” said Mark Stern, President Original Content, Syfy and Co-Head, Original Content, Universal Cable Productions. “While the Ghost Hunters mission of helping those in need remains at the heart of each investigation, we’re thrilled by the increased scope of the cases being undertaken and the series’ revitalized style and energy, all of which contribute to making Ghost Hunters an even more vibrant, visually stimulating and exciting experience going into its ninth season.”

In Season 9, fans can look forward to seeing the TAPS (The Atlantic Paranormal Society) team’s latest innovations in ghost hunting equipment and techniques, as they use more technology than ever before to capture evidence of paranormal activity. TAPS – led by Jason Hawes – will investigate new, high-profile locations across the country, while continuing its mission of helping families in need of assistance from the Ghost Hunters.

Since its Season 8 mid-season premiere on September 5, Ghost Hunters has averaged 1 million viewers in Adults 18-49, 1.3 million viewers in Adults 25-54 and 2.2 million total viewers (all data Live +7). The midseason premiere was also the paranormal series’ most-watched premiere since August 2010.

Season 8 continues through December 5, wrapping up with a special holiday investigation at the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut.

Since its 2004 premiere, Ghost Hunters has spawned two spin-offs with over 200 episodes among the three series, cementing its place as the No. 1 paranormal franchise on cable. For more than eight years, Ghost Hunters has set the standard for paranormal series, offering viewers spine-tingling investigations by the TAPS team.

Ghost Hunters is produced for Syfy by Craig Piligian’s Pilgrim Studios (Dirty Jobs, The Ultimate Fighter, Top Shot). Piligian and Thomas Thayer, along with Mike Nichols and Alan David, serve as executive producers.

Syfy is a media destination for imagination-based entertainment. With year round acclaimed original series, events, blockbuster movies, classic science fiction and fantasy programming, a dynamic Web site (www.Syfy.com), and a portfolio of adjacent business (Syfy Ventures), Syfy is a passport to limitless possibilities. Originally launched in 1992 as SCI FI Channel, and currently in more than 98 million homes, Syfy is a network of NBCUniversal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies. (Syfy. Imagine greater.)

SyFy Renews ‘Haunted Collector’ For Third Season

Via Press Release:

SYFY RENEWS HIT PARANORMAL SERIES HAUNTED COLLECTOR FOR THIRD SEASON

RETURNS IN 2013 WITH 12 ALL-NEW EPISODES

NEW YORK – September 17, 2012 – Syfy has renewed its hit paranormal series Haunted Collector for a third season. The series, which demonstrated significant viewership gains during its second season by jumping 18 percent in Adults 18-49, will return with 12 all-new episodes in 2013.

Eminent paranormal collector John Zaffis and his team of investigators respond to SOS calls from around the country by individuals and businesses who’ve been terrorized by items that have been taken over by paranormal spirits and/or energy.

Through careful research, Zaffis works with the owner to find the best solution to the ghostly problem, such as returning the item to its owner, burying the object in its place of origin or storing it in his paranormal museum in Stratford, Connecticut.

During season two, Haunted Collector averaged 532,000 Adults 18-49, 663,000 Adults 25-54 and 1.17 million total viewers, growing +5 percent / +18 percent / +6 percent, respectively, versus season one. Haunted Collector also ranked #7 in Adults 25-54 and #10 in Adults 18-49 among cable entertainment programming in its 9-10PM (ET/PT) time slot.

Haunted Collector is produced by Gurney Productions. Executive producers are Scott Gurney and Deirdre Gurney.

Syfy is a media destination for imagination-based entertainment. With year round acclaimed original series, events, blockbuster movies, classic science fiction and fantasy programming, a dynamic Web site (www.Syfy.com), and a portfolio of adjacent business (Syfy Ventures), Syfy is a passport to limitless possibilities. Originally launched in 1992 as SCI FI Channel, and currently in more than 98 million homes, Syfy is a network of NBCUniversal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies. (Syfy. Imagine greater.)

VIC’S REVIEW: ‘Chasing UFOs’ (National Geographic – Friday, 10:00 pm)

A team of trained investigators sets out to uncover the truth about UFOs. But they’re not just looking for more stories on extraterrestrial activity—they want answers. Risking it all, this team of scientists and UFO researchers investigate and dissect some of the most mysterious sightings on the planet to unearth stunning new evidence. The data they collect on these adventures paints an entirely new picture of what we know about these strange lights in the sky. – Nat Geo

Rating:     50 out of 100

Chasing UFOs is a very strange and peculiar amalgam of various “paranormal reality” shows. It is a blend of some more cerebral and methodical ghost hunting shows mixed in with the zaniness of your average UFO/Alien programs such as UFO Hunters and the zaniest of all alien documentary shows, the grand poobah, Ancient Aliens, I must admit when the show was announced I was intrigued on how they would pull off something like chasing UFOs around in the skies. Especially when the chasers themselves, Ben McGee (The Skeptic), James Fox (The Believer and man, does he ever believe) and the cute, spunky leader and Tech person, Erin Ryder, are so damned earth-bound. I was curious indeed.

Being a sucker for these paranormal shows (that are becoming more and more prevalent), I bit the bullet and tuned in. Having devoured shows like this in the past like SyFy’s Ghost Hunters, History’s UFO Hunters and a bevy of other shows from A&E and even Bio, I expected a familiar approach and philosophy throughout the program. Boy, did I get blind-sided. First, I set my expectations way too high… my fault. Second, I was spoiled by how serious and informative most of these show try to be no matter how funky it all came across. Chasing UFO’s, sadly is a bit of a letdown but I stuck it out because it does have its charms. They are few and far between, but enough to warrant a re-watch of other episodes that do progress nicely while the chemistry between our “chasers” improve and entertain.

So, where I’m going with this is that the strongest asset, in my opinion, is the cast themselves. They come from diverse backgrounds and their home base is in California. They travel the country tracking down witnesses, experts, retired astronauts and just about every other type of UFO zealot and weirdo. In the show’s defense, though, they do track down very respectable  citizens such as law enforcement officers and military personnel., which does add to the credibility, somewhat, with emphasis on the “somewhat.”  The “chasers” come across quite friendly and familiar with each other and when “in the field” they have a good rapport and seem very dedicated to their individual beliefs, but unfortunately, it’s just too ludicrous at times when we get to the actual chasing and science.

The set up for each episode is done capably (interviews, facts and confessionals) but then the night-time treks into places like the Everglades, swamps, forests, caves and woods (even a place in Brazil where aliens have been spotted roaming and living off the land.) are incredibly lame and uneventful. Where is the science? They seem to just be going out with all this expensive tech and camera gear and point at the sky at any light that passes by and freak out. They even walk around with a rig that sticks out from the shoulder and closes in on the faces. How about cameras that look out into the sky, instead? Duh. Ryder, on several occasions, has tripped, screamed, jumped and cursed at just about everything. One episode she almost has a stroke watching a vid in a van of a light in the sky that turns out to be some kind of reflection. It is always nothing. Nothing concrete or even remotely extraterrestrial. It’s quite laughable at times. The “data” is always inconclusive. Well, duh. The Three Stooges can gather data and chase UFOs better. I know, I’m being harsh, but I must be honest.

Chasing UFOs should just be called Chasing Lights in the Sky or Chasing Animals that Live in the Forest.  While investigating they also act like total buffoons. They trip over things, argue, get their jeeps stuck in mud and get lost in snake infested swamps. Actually these bits are what I like about the show. It’s frivolous, funny and a welcome diversion from the corny investigative side of the show. Ben is the skeptic and my favorite of the 3 . He’s down to earth and authentic while James is clearly the Fox Mulder of the show.  I respect his fervor though. He even gets visibly upset and cries after hearing a witness testimony. Ryder is appropriate eye candy but all of her foolishness (some of it very funny and dare I say endearing) and cursing detracts from the show. Hey but who cares? They are chasing UFOs!

So in closing, this show is just too unreal to really be of any serious merit. I get the feeling that sometimes it may even be a bit scripted. Even thought the banter between the three seems natural and the only thing that is worth watching. The investigations are trivial, boring and feel in no way credible. I have to mention one episode where they are supposedly chased by military agents in boats protecting the launch facility at Cape Canaveral. It was hilarious. You’d think it was some black ops force or Navy Seals hunting them down to protect some government conspiracy. This show had potential early on but while the cast is at times very serious about UFOs, it’s their actual cartoonish chasing that is pretty dead on arrival. Chase this show down at your own risk.

Victor

‘Fringe’ Moves to Friday Nights: FOX Pledges Full Support. Don’t Be Fooled. Fans Need To Read This.

If you haven’t heard already, Fox has moved the J.J. Abrams fan-favorite Sci Fi thriller, Fringe,  from the Thursday at 9:00 p.m. slot to the dreaded Friday at 9:00 p.m. slot.  Now as much as we here at The ‘Tastic love Fringe (to the point where we consider it to be one of the top five shows on television), we weren’t necessarily surprised by this because as we’ve pointed out, FOX pisses their pants every time they see a ratings drop.

We also noted that while the other major networks are starting to take Friday nights seriously once again,  FOX has decidedly NOT taken this approach, designating the night for reality shows and as a dumping ground for shows that haven’t done as well as they had hoped which is usually the fault of FOX to begin with (see: The Good Guys for the most recent example of this and our analysis here).  So, we’ve come to accept that no show is ever safe on FOX and that without fail, if a show is designated for Friday night it will not be renewed at the end of the season or if it is, it will wither pretty quickly the following season.  Now, with Fringe, there’s been a bit of a twist in this whole saga this week, which we’ll get to shortly, but first, it is necessary to address a fact of life that we’ve really been holding off on admitting for a long time but here it is:

FOX is an awful network and quite possibly the worst network ever… period.  End of discussion.  FOX is worse than The CW and it may possibly be worse than UPN or The WB ever was.  The network is poorly run, they make terrible, amateurish decisions regarding their programming, they have absolutely no idea how to market quality programming in order to pique interest and they don’t give shows a chance to build an audience or even maintain a modest one.  We will remind you that this is the same network that canceled Family Guy and the only reason it came back after a three-year hiatus is because The Cartoon Network aired the 49 episodes it had acquired the syndication rights to at 11:00 p.m. nightly and it gave THAT network the highest ratings in its history.  So, to make this clear, a show FOX cancelled after only 49 episodes put another network on the map when they aired them… at 11:00 p.m.

The only reason FOX has had any success is because they have had a handful of successful shows that they have MILKED TO DEATH.  Here’s the thing about that: a successful show should be able to give a network a lot of leeway with their programming and give a lot of other shows a chance to build an audience and become successful.  What this means is that a show, for example, such as American Idol, can make enough money to basically support the growth of shows that are critically acclaimed however struggle in the ratings.  This is not a new concept in either film or cinema.

Think of it like this: why do major studios invest money in relatively low-budget films with little-to-no anticipated payoff?  Well, that’s because the film industry although motivated by profit like any other industry, still sees the value in the art they produce for the sake of the art itself and they believe that every now and then, the quality of the art for art’s sake may just turn into gold.  A prime example of this is Paranormal Activity which Paramount/Dreamworks picked up the rights to for $300,000.  Why would a major studio throw $300,000 away on a low-budget ($15,000), genre film that had little-to-no chance of making them any money?  Well, first, because Stephen Spielberg REALLLLLLY liked it and second (and probably more importantly), because between G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen and Star Trek, Paramount grossed $1.5 billion domestically at the box office in 2009 on just those three films. So what it comes down to is that studios can afford to take more risks when they have money makers like that.  Of course, with Paranormal Activity, that risk paid off nicely, grossing $194 million globally.  Not a bad bet for a lousy $300,000, eh?

The same principle applies to television and even FOX has actually had success with this principle when they’ve applied it but they’ve only attempted it once and that was with 24 and that was nearly a decade ago.  They stuck with that show early on despite the fact that the ratings had slipped in the first season and they even used American Idol as the lead-in and it worked.

FOX simply has no foresight or vision when it comes to the potential value of good TV, despite slipping ratings and quite frankly they are missing a much bigger point and that is that due to their 20 year history of reckless programming decisions, generally speaking, audiences don’t want to give FOX a chance any more when it comes to scripted programming.  Why would they bother to ever consider getting invested in a scripted show on FOX when it’s more than likely not going to last for any significant amount of time?  It’s a vicious cycle.  FOX cancels shows (or dumps them into Friday) because the ratings slide, the ratings slide because the audiences don’t have any faith that FOX won’t cancel their show.

Now, back to the big twist in the news this week regarding the moving of Fringe to Friday…

Last week a whole bunch of blogs and entertainment news sites a lot more reputable than The ‘Tastic all had basically the same thing to say about the move.  To put it simply: they all contend that the move marked the beginning of the end for the series which certainly isn’t a stretch, particularly with FOX.

Well, the FOX execs didn’t like that too much so they came up with this little trailer that addresses (and quotes) the cynical (albeit realistic) commentary from the writers at Collider, Ain’t It Cool News, IGN, TV Overmind, and Fringe Bloggers who for some bizarre reason just don’t seem to have any faith in FOX’s support of this show.

How cute is that, right?  We’re convinced.  Aren’t you?

Entertainment Weekly, who apparently has no problem being a corporate shill for FOX and perpetuating B.S., did a nice little puff-piece where they quote FOX’s senior VP of marketing and special projects, Dean Norris, explaining what prompted the trailer:

We started getting feedback from the viewers that basically said, ‘How could Fox do something so cool for a show they’re going to kill?’ We started reading these things and said, ‘Wait! We have to address this!’” The mission was to produce a piece of communication that dealt with the situation in a self-deprecating fashion, yet also assuaged fan fears. The message, spelled out in the promo: “You May Think Friday Is Dead… But We’re Gonna Reanimate It.”

Well, that sounds great because after all if there is one thing FOX is good at it’s animation… and RE-animation for that matter (see: Family Guy).

Now, standby in 3… 2… 1… for the big lie:

The promo is the beginning of a larger effort by Fox to shore up Fringe’s existing fanbase and hopefully grow the audience by targeting teen viewers who might be at home Friday night… “We are trying to rebrand Friday, and what we’re trying to do with this show specifically is make it kind of like forbidden fruit,” says Norris. “We want that teen demographic that might not be our audience right now to say, ‘That this is a show my parents might not want me to watch — but I’m going to watch it, anyway.’”

…And this is exactly why we don’t trust FOX and neither should you.  First, and foremost let’s just examine this entire quote, shall we?

Mr. Norris, please explain to us how FOX plans to “shore up” its existing fanbase by alienating it, yet again.  The problem that we pointed out earlier is that it’s not even necessarily the fact that it’s on a Friday night… the problem is that it’s on FOX on a Friday night and their history with television shows – ESPECIALLY Sci Fi shows! – on that night.

Our first hint of skepticism regarding this sudden change of heart was in that dopey little promo itself.  It’s the quote from Roco at Fringe Blogger that they cite:

This is indeed the night… others were cast out to die.

Anytime we see a quote cited and there is ellipsis in the middle of the quote, we always research the actual source to find out exactly what the quoter wanted to leave out in order to advance their agenda.  Here’s the actual quote by Roco:

This is indeed the night the likes of Dollhouse, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, Firefly and others were cast out to die.

And there it is, folks; what FOX wants you to forget about.  The fact is that not only has FOX been brutal to Sci Fi shows that they’ve abandoned to Friday night, they’ve also spun similar stories about support and similar clever promo campaigns that REALLY made people think they gave a crap.  I refer you to the Dollhouse/Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles promos from spring of 2009.

Here’s our favorite… when Summer Glau and Eliza Dushku actually hosted the “Double Feature Friday” of Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles and the series premiere of Dollhouse.

Three months later Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles was canceled and six months after that Dollhouse was canceled.  Obviously, this is an example of FOX fully supporting their friday night Sci Fi shows.

To add more salt into that particular wound and prove the point about the total lack of vision at FOX, in May of 2009 those two shows had identical audience numbers, but FOX, in their infinite wisdom and foresight, decided to cancel Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles which had 11.4 million viewers during its first season before being dumped into Friday, was incredibly well-received by critics, had an established franchise brand-name and a built-in audience in favor of renewing the Joss Whedon mess called Dollhouse that had none of these attributes going for it.  Once again, nice job, FOX.

We won’t even discuss what they did to one of the greatest and regrettably short-lived series of all time, Firefly (also a Joss Whedon show).

As for the last big lie in that quote… who are they kidding?  Are we really supposed to believe that teenagers are going to stay in on a Friday night to watch a Sci Fi serial?  Furthermore, the reality is that it’s nearly impossible to expand the base for a show like this.

We know exactly what they’re thinking or at least the premise that they are going for in trying to promote this big lie and that is that Fringe is like The X-Files (as it’s been compared to that hit series since it debuted) and that it can appeal to everyone on that level.  Wrong.  They aren’t the same show at all and the reason why it doesn’t work is that roughly 2/3 of the 202 episodes of The X-Files were standalone, “monster-of-the-week” type episodes that were literally disconnected from the main storyline arc of Mulder’s quest for the proof of alien abduction so he could find his sister.

Fringe’s main story arc is omnipresent in every single episode whether it’s integral to the story of that particular episode or not and as much as we love The X-Files, Fringe’s main arc is a helluva lot more complicated than The X-Files alien arc ever was.  As a viewer, you cannot just jump into a show like Fringe halfway through its third season.  It would be the equivalent of jumping into Lost halfway through the third season.  You’d be lost and Norris must know this and if he doesn’t he’s completely incompetent.

So that’s what we’re left with.  TPTB at FOX are either completely incompetent or completely dishonest and what’s ridiculous is how many other bloggers and various media outlets are falling for this sudden change of heart by FOX regarding their dedication to a Sci Fi show that they have parked on Friday night.  Seriously, how dumb are they?  This is “battered viewer syndrome” (…and I’m not going to explain that particular metaphor) if we’ve ever seen it.  Do not trust FOX and their claims of unmitigated support for Fringe or any other show they move to Friday until they can be proven to be trustworthy.  The first step in doing that would be for them to order the remaining episodes for this season and order an entire fourth season and promise to air all of the episodes.  At this point, that would be the only way we would ever trust them and that’s not going to happen, so all we can do is hope for the best but plan for the worst which means expect Fringe to be canceled in May.  Let’s just hope that they bring some closure to this great series.

And, by the way… we really hope we’re wrong but we doubt that we are.