FX: ‘American Horror Story’ Renewed For Third Season

Via Press Release:

FX ORDERS NEXT BOOK OF American Horror Story 

Network Picks Up 13 Hours of the Third Incarnation of AHS Which Debuts in Fall of 2013 

Golden Globe®, SAG® and Emmy® Award Winner Jessica Lange Set to Return 

Last Night’s Episode of American Horror Story: Asylum Once Again Topped All Broadcast Networks At 10 PM in Delivery of Adults 18-34, Men 18-34 and Women 18-34 

Asylum Ends Run on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 

Ratings for Asylum Running +19% Ahead of Its Predecessor American Horror Story 

LOS ANGELES, November 15, 2012 – FX has ordered the next book of the award-winning miniseries American Horror Story, picking up 13 hours of a new miniseries from Twentieth Century Fox Television, it was announced today by John Landgraf, President and General Manager of FX Networks. Production of the untitled AHS will begin next summer and premiere in the fall of 2013.

American Horror Story: Asylum, the latest hit in the American Horror Story saga, wraps up its run on Wednesday, January 23 at 10 PM E/P. Last night’s episode (11/14/12) of Asylum topped all broadcast networks in the 10 PM time period in delivery of Adults 18-34 (2.1), Women 18-34 (2.4) and Men 18-34 (1.7). Asylum also ranked #3 among Adults 18-34 in primetime versus all broadcast programs behind Modern Family (3.3) and The X Factor (2.7). The episode grew +30% versus prior week in Adults 18-34, driven by a +45% gain among Women 18-34, and it also posted a +9% increase in Adults 18-49 (Live+Same Day ratings, Fast Nationals, subject to change).

“With American Horror Story: Asylum, Ryan and Brad have raised the bar in every way from Murder House, the first American Horror Story miniseries,” said Landgraf. “And their original idea—the notion of doing an anthological series of miniseries with a repertory cast—has proven groundbreaking, wildly successful and will prove to be trendsetting. We can’t wait to see what deviously brilliant ideas they come up with for their third miniseries.”

Co-Creators/Executive Producers Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk have not announced the new title or story for the next incarnation of the American Horror Story franchise. As was the case with American Horror Story and American Horror Story: Asylum, many of the actors will return in different roles next year, including star Jessica Lange, who won Golden Globe, Screen Actors Guild and Emmy awards for her portrayal of “Constance Langdon” in American Horror Story. Starring as “Sister Jude” in AHS: Asylum, Lange will be moving to the Lead Actress category in the Golden Globe and Emmy awards this year.

“The American Horror Story anthology is a labor of love for all of us and we could not be prouder of the work our brilliant company of actors and everyone on the production team is doing this year,” said Murphy. “To John and our friends at FX and Dana Walden and Gary Newman at 20th, we thank you for your vote of confidence — and to our loyal audience, keep watching!”

Following the success of the inaugural miniseries American Horror Story, the award-winning Co-Creator/Executive Producer/Writer/Director Murphy announced that AHS would be a new show every year with no relation to any prior version of AHS. Each book will feature an entirely different theme, setting and characters, even though many of the actors will return to the program in entirely new roles.

The ratings for AHS: Asylum are showing double-digit percentage growth in every demo compared to its predecessor, American Horror Story, pacing +19% ahead of prior year in Adults 18-49 (see complete ratings data set at the bottom of this email). On a Live+7 basis, Asylum is averaging 5.23 million Total Viewers, 3.88 Million Adults 18-49, and 2.40 million Adults 18-34, which reflect respective gains of +19% in Total Viewers and Adults 18-49 and +22% in Adults 18-34. The program’s highest growth is among Women 18-49 and Men 18-34, each up +24% over prior year. American Horror Story: Asylum is delivering one of the highest audience compositions of Adults 18-49 with an average of 74% of its total audience falling within that demo. The median age of the audience for AHS: Asylum is 33 years old, and AHS: Asylum is one of the top-rated dramas on television in delivery of Adults 18-34 with a 3.54 national rating inclusive of Live+7 viewing. Live+Same Day viewing is up versus prior year, and Live+7 viewing has increased over prior year (+56%) off of a larger base audience.

American Horror Story: Asylum continues to be one of the most talked about shows on television on social media according to Bluefin Labs Social Media. Bluefin measures the total number of comments about primetime TV programs on Facebook, Twitter and GetGlue, and American Horror Story: Asylum has been cable’s #1 show on that metric every Wednesday since its debut (four weeks) and ranked among the top three programs on TV during that same timeframe.

Set in 1964, American Horror Story: Asylum takes us into a Church-run haven for the criminally insane, ruled with an iron fist by Sister Jude (Jessica Lange), a nun with a troubled past. Inside this locked down facility, danger lurks around every corner. From Nazis and serial killers, to mutants and aliens, no one is safe inside these walls. Starring Jessica Lange as “Sister Jude,” Sarah Paulson as “Lana Winters,” James Cromwell as “Dr. Arthur Arden,” Evan Peters as “Kit Walker,” Lily Rabe as “Sister Mary Eunice,” Lizzie Brocheré as “Grace,” Zachary Quinto as “Dr. Oliver Thredson,” and Joseph Fiennes as “Monsignor Timothy Howard.” Guest stars for the miniseries will include Frances Conroy, Chloë Sevigny, Adam Levine, Jenna Dewan-Tatum, Mark Consuelos, and Ian McShane.

American Horror Story: Asylum was Co-Created by Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, who serve as Executive Producers alongside Dante Di Loreto and Tim Minear. American Horror Story: Asylum is produced by 20th Century Fox Television.

20th Century Fox Television, a division of News Corp, is a leading supplier of entertainment content, domestically and around the world.

FX is the flagship general entertainment basic cable network from Fox. Launched in June of 1994, FX is carried in more than 98 million homes. The diverse schedule features a growing roster of critically acclaimed and award-winning hit dramas series Sons Of Anarchy and Justified; the miniseries American Horror Story: Asylum; the upcoming drama series The Americans (1/13); the acclaimed hit comedy series It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia, The League, Louie, Archer, Wilfred, BrandX with Russell Brand, and Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell; and the upcoming comedy Legit (1/13). The network’s library of acquired box-office hit movies is unmatched by any ad-supported television network. FX’s other offerings include the acquired hit series Two and a Half Men and How I Met Your Mother, and live sports with UFC and NCAA football.

VIC’S REVIEW: ‘American Horror Story’ – Season One (FX – Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.)

American Horror Story revolves around the Harmons, a family of three who moved from Boston to Los Angeles as a means to reconcile past anguish. They move to a restored mansion, unaware that the home is haunted. The all-star cast features Dylan McDermott as “Ben Harmon,” a psychiatrist; Connie Britton as “Vivien Harmon,” Ben’s wife; Taissa Farmiga as “Violet,” the Harmon’s teenage daughter; Jessica Lange in her first-ever regular series TV role as “Constance,” the Harmon’s neighbor; Evan Peters plays “Tate Langdon,” one of Ben’s patients; and Denis O’Hare as “Larry Harvey.” Guest stars for the series include Frances Conroy as the Harmon’s housekeeper; Alexandra Breckenridge as the Harmon’s housekeeper; and Jamie Brewer as Constance’s daughter.

Rating:     75 out of 100

I suppose I’ve had more than ample time to let FX’s American Horror Story sink in. The new Season – American Horror Story: Asylum premieres on October 17th and we get a completely different locale, characters and story (Even though some actors like Jessica Lange and Zachary Quinto do return) to get wrapped up in. I admit that I was very pumped and psyched for this new horror series that eventually frightened the audience with a disturbing premise that forced the show to become somewhat polarizing to many viewers while definitely pushing the envelope.  It wasn’t from lack of execution, no doubt. The show, from the pilot alone, demonstrated flair, drama, scares and conventional yet capable performances from the cast. The opening alone (which is too damned long) gave me the creeps and had me dwelling on what I would find remotely terrifying about this show.  So, yes, I became excited about a weekly balls-to-the-wall horror series.

I wasn’t disappointed at all. I tuned in every week to watch the ghostly and ghastly happenings at the large, haunted mansion where the very dysfunctional Harmon family reside. Dylan McDermot as Ben Harmon is a shrink and practices from home. He has a sordid past indeed that involves cheating on his wife and alcohol dependency. Dylan is headstrong and provincial in his performance and bodes well in the role. Connie Britton, (Spin City) who is very fetching here, plays the emotionally estranged wife, Vivien. She is damaged as well. She trusts no one especially her husband and cannot seem to connect with their daughter, Violet, played brilliantly by Taissa Farmiga (Higher Ground). So, there is a lot of baggage here to begin with plus they have that other problem. They live in a very haunted house. A house that is so damn haunted we are introduced to terrifying new flashbacks regarding past occupants every week.

So, like I stated before, I thought some more on this show and re-watched some episodes and it doesn’t seem to be as exciting or revelatory the second time around. I am not as impressed now as when I watched the show initially. I think besides the very good acting ensemble, there are some flaws that didn’t stand out before. I think I became wrapped up in the shows brutal “in your face” horror antics every week that I missed the fact that the show lacked balance and was hurt by an increasing convoluted story-line. It confused me and that’s never good since I love to be scared… just not for the sake of being scared.

Many by now have seen the show’s first season and know all about the murderous intentions of the dead occupants of the mansion. So, I won’t go over the story very much. That cat has been out of the bag a long time now.

Jessica Lange’s (King Kong) portrayal of Constance Langdon is a marvel to behold. She is unpredictable, maternal one moment and a hellspawn the next. She is also murderous but caring and boy does she hate the Harmon’s shape-shifting maid Moira who appears differently to just about everyone in the house. Lange is most definitely the standout in this show. She gives us a tragic and multi-facted performance as Constance. She is the Harmon’s neighbor from hell who also has a long and sordid history regarding the mansion. Her son Tate, played by Evan Peters is just as whacked as she is. Tate, who is a spirit, seems to be very alive. He roams around the mansion like he owns it. How the hell do these people not know who are dead spirits and who are living people? Hmm. Curious. Anyway, Tate is a suicidal kid with a history of violence. He was my least favorite character. Too mopey and too whiney and eventually just a psychotic mama’s boy.

Rounding the very gruesome cast is Zachary Quinto, another great addition. He is one of the more rounded and believable characters. He is brilliantly well written. Quinto manages to steal every episode he’s in. He is fun to watch even though at times we get bogged down in some dumb “scary house” drama that goes no where. But anyway the show does work well when we aren’t subjected to too much information at once. When the story unravels nicely it’s good but mostly the creators (Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk) dwell on blasting us with images of bloody jars, slit throats, burnt people and guys dressed in leather. They do establish that the house has a mythology which includes tragic characters as if from a greek play. The Black Dahlia, played stunningly by Mena Suvari, being one of them. I would normally get a bit overwhelmed by it all but I stuck it out if only to follow the story to its conclusion.

James Levine provides a very creepy score that envelops us and the photography by John Aronson and Micheal Goi is finely crafted and they take advantage of natural light to make the mansion look deadly and the actors very malicious. So much happens in the duration of season one that by the 12th episode’s end I felt like I ran a marathon. I feel that the show at a steady pace benefited well, but at warp-speed we lost connection with all the various characters. I almost needed a flow chart sometimes. I do recommend watching perhaps the last three or four episodes before Asylum begins, just to get connected again. American Horror Story may get better this next season. I do admit re-visiting some of the scarier episodes had me wanting more… just not that much more.

Victor